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I have an apartment in a city which overlooks a building site for a brand new 57 story skyscraper - I have been here since the site was first cleared, and have followed the progress with great interest.

Considering the city I live in has an earthquake risk, the direction the construction has taken hasn't quite been what I would expect for a 57 story tower... So I am now curious as to what's currently going on and would love some input.

Are questions such as "what's going on here" or "what's this structure for" supported by photos and descriptions of activities to date on topic for this SE?

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The bar is pretty high for these types of questions. In general, they end up being relatively vague and necessary information is typically lacking. They also often end up being rants in disguise where there isn't a genuine question.

57 story skyscrapers can be safely built in earthquake prone areas. And while I am definitely not an expert in that area, I know that there have been many recent advances in construction technique that help mitigate the obvious risks.

So it's possible the question would be on-topic and sufficiently narrow that it can be reasonably answered. But there's a also a pretty good probability that the question would be closed as too broad or unclear.

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  • $\begingroup$ Definitely not a rant, and I know skyscrapers can be built in earthquake areas - it's the approach they seem to be taking which I am interested in. The footprint has been cleared and a retaining wall built, the interior excavated to two floors below but no piling put in. They are now erecting some sort of huge steel structure around the interior of the retaining wall with huge corner bracings. I'm just wondering what that steel structure is for. It's laid directly on steel plates which in turn are laid on aggregate covered in sheeting. $\endgroup$ – Moo Oct 18 '18 at 1:32
  • $\begingroup$ Could very well be on-topic then. $\endgroup$ – user16 Oct 18 '18 at 1:59

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